Eggstra Special Treatment

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Even though the Easter season is only halfway through, I’m retiring the plastic and wooden Easter eggs. I can’t handle it anymore. Ds likes to test them out as if they are balls. He drops them from heights, throws them across the kitchen to watch them open in two and dumps the baskets or buckets of eggs onto the floor in various places. And I’m not getting complete cooperation in cleaning them up after playing with them. I’m slipping on eggs, trying to teach a lesson, but I’m losing the battle. My house is being overrun with plastic eggs. Back to the Easter box for next year.

So why post about plastic eggs in a food blog? DS is ALLERGIC to real eggs. He can’t eat them without having an anaphylactic reaction and he can’t touch them (or have other people who touch or eat them then touch him) without getting hives. I don’t want to condemn all eggs, even the kinds that can’t harm ds, just because he’s allergic. Now, if he couldn’t be in the same room with the smell or odor of eggs without reacting, I think I would have a stronger stance. So I’m writing about having eggs in a non-allergic fashion.

I love eggs, especially at Eastertime. The new life bursting out of a shell is the perfect symbol of the Resurrection–Jesus coming out the tomb. I love the traditional art of decorating eggs, such as the Ukrainian pysanky eggs. I’ve enjoyed trying my hand at making pysanky, too. Every year we decorate and dye eggs with the extended family. It’s an ongoing tradition. We use Crayons and cover the eggs with Easter symbolism and alleluias and then dye them. The most beautiful egg with Alleluia becomes the special Alleluia Egg for the Easter Egg Hunt on Easter Sunday.

But that was before ds was diagnosed with egg allergies. I’ve had to cut back on our “egg hoopla” for Easter. But he wants a part of the traditions, so this Easter we dealt with eggs head on. Okay, not exactly head on, but some ideas that made it easier to deal with his sensitivity and allergy to eggs.

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medium_gregory_cross.jpg1) Painting: I couldn’t do pysanky eggs, nor color eggs, so we painted. We painted a wooden cross from the Dollar Store and wooden eggs with colorful paints. I also created a Resurrection Garden scene, with a Sculpey tomb. Ds and I had fun painting that, also, and getting the materials to create the rest of the scene.

medium_egg_hunting.jpg2) Plastic eggs in abundance: My one brother-in-law runs the Easter Egg Hunt at my mother’s house. He set aside a part of the yard as my son’s area and hid plastic eggs for him (before he touched the other eggs, too…very thoughtful). Ds searched for eggs while the rest of the hunt went on around him. He felt that he was a part of the activities.

3) White House Easter Egg Roll: We had the privilege of attending this year on Easter Monday. Egg Rolls is an old tradition that harkens back to the stone that rolled back from Christ’s tomb. Although very wet (it rained the whole time we were there), ds really enjoyed the sport of rolling an egg to the finish line with a kitchen spoon. With the long spoon, ds could play without touching the egg. Next year, I want to have an egg roll in our own backyard.

medium_dying_easter_eggs.jpg4) Dying eggs: We didn’t color designs with Crayons this year, as touching the eggs can spread the allergens. I strove for minimal handling. So we used food coloring and dyed eggs. We only did a dozen, and dipped straight into the cups. Ds was fine watching and supervising, but no touching. He loved the result and talked about the beautiful colors, but no contact, so no reaction.

Top image courtesy of freeimages.co.uk. Other images, just my apology. Developer messed up my order so I didn’t get a copy on a disk and I’m inept at scanning.

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